Caesar’s Supply Lines: How They Worked and Why They Failed

16 April 2021 4:00pm4:30pm
Mark Mather, The University of Queensland

Games and Gambling in Classical Athens: Pedagogy and Problems

16 April 2021 4:30pm5:00pm
Rory Ardill-Walker, The University of Queensland

The Politics of Greece’s Theatrical Revolution: From 500 to 300 BC

30 April 2021 4:00pm5:15pm
Professor Peter Wilson, The University of Sydney

Citizenship and Philanthropy in Athenagoras’s Legatio

7 May 2021 4:45pm5:15pm
Dr David Evans (Macquarie University)
Coastlines of the Ice Age

Lost Worlds, Discovery Narratives and Australia’s Deep History

19 May 2021 5:30pm6:45pm
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry's Annual Lecture

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Miracles and Divine Agency in the Central Trilogy of the Old French Crusade Cycle

26 March 2021 1:00pm2:00pm
The events of the First Crusade were reimagined and rewritten repeatedly for generations after they took place at the end of the eleventh century.

Bribery in the Roman Republic

19 March 2021 4:00pm4:30pm
Miles-Christian Maureira, The University of Queensland

Bilateralism and dialogue

12 March 2021 2:00pm3:00pm
In her recent book The Dialogical Roots of Deduction, Catarina Dutilh Novaes explores the role of dialogue in understanding deductive reasoning. In this talk, I approach these ideas from a bilaterialist perspective, focused on assertion and denial, and draw out some lessons for understanding the relationship between validity of arguments and the activity of deduction.

Status and Benefits: Veterans in the Age of Total War

12 March 2021 1:00pm2:00pm
Why were some soldiers treated generously by governments when they returned home from war, while others were not? What determined whether veterans, disabled or not, received gratitude and material rewards in the form of generous pensions, educational, housing and other benefits, or were denied them?

Buddhist Logic from a Global Perspective

5 March 2021 2:00pm3:00pm
Buddhist philosophers have developed a rich tradition of logic. Buddhist material on logic that forms the Buddhist tradition of logic, however, is hardly discussed or even known. This talk will present some of that material in a manner that is accessible to contemporary philosophers and sets agendas for global philosophy of logic.

The Origins and Persistence of Possibilism

26 February 2021 2:00pm3:00pm
Possibilism is widely defined to be the thesis that there are — in the broadest sense — things that do not exist, or that are not actual. Actualism is the denial of this thesis. In this talk I will discuss the historical origins of modern possibilism and address an important challenge to the coherence of the possibilism-actualism distinction.

HDR Research Showcase

6 November 2020 2:00pm4:00pm

Memories and Narratives, an ongoing reflection

23 October 2020 1:00pm2:00pm
The University of Queensland’s School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry invites you to virtually attend ‘Memories and Narratives, an ongoing reflection’, presented online by Professor Lynette Russell. All are welcome.

Race, Religion & Culture Film Series - Film 2

23 September 2020 1:00pm3:00pm

Music of Spheres: In-conversation

18 September 2020 3:00pm4:00pm
Join Music of Spheres student curator Elena Dias-Jayasinha in conversation with ARC Fellow at UQ School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry Dr Peter Evans as they explore how the Pythagorean concept of 'music of the spheres' applies to modern Physics, Shakespeare and UQ Art Museum’s current exhibition.

WHAT'S MY NAME: Muhammad Ali - Part 1

9 September 2020 1:00pm3:00pm

Friends of Antiquity Sunday Series: Dr. Kit Morrell (UQ, Susan Blake Lecturer in Roman History)

5 July 2020 2:00pm3:00pm
‘Exemplary Reformers: Scaevola, Rutilius, and the Governance of Asia’

Webinar - After the Plague: Insights from Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern History

10 June 2020 6:00pm7:00pm
As we look towards our post-COVID-19 society, we are likely to see more than just a recovery of the 2019 world, but something completely new. UQ historians will come together to discuss what has come after plagues throughout ancient, medieval and early modern history and what it may mean for our world today.

Webinar - After the Plague: Insights from Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern History

10 June 2020 6:00pm7:00pm
Each pandemic throughout history has brought suffering and civil unrest, but in their wake has come a blossoming of art, literature and new ideas. These upheavals have forced people to rethink the world around them, leading to some of history’s most influential and challenging cultural works. As we look towards our post-COVID-19 society, we are likely to see more than just a recovery of the 2019 world, but something completely new. UQ historians will come together to discuss what has come after plagues throughout ancient, medieval and early modern history and what it may mean for our world today.

POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE: Dr. Janette McWilliam: (UQ, R.D. Milns Antiquities Museum)

Cancelled
7 June 2020 2:30pm3:30pm
‘Museum-Based Courses and Programs at the R.D. Milns Antiquities Museum for UQ Students’

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